Library Loot: August 15-21

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library.

I’m trying to read more literature that isn’t British or US-American again, I used to read a lot but then majoring in American Studies I got so caught up in reading lists and research, I hardly read anything else. Partly this goal seems to go hand in hand with reading more chunksters, at the moment I’m reading Roberto Bolano’s 2666 and started Vikram Seth’s A Suitable Boy to join Jo’s readalong. On my visit to the library yesterday I found a couple of great books that have at the most 320 pages, so hopefully I won’t feel too intimidated by chunksters to abandon the whole thing immediately.

Eine Zeit ohne Tod (José Saramago)

Has been translated into English as Death with Interruptions. What if no one dies? One day, Death goes on strike. My first Saramago, please tell me I didn’t loot the most difficult of his works!

Das geheime Leben der Bücher (Régis de sá Moreira)

Translated from the French Le Libraire, but I haven’t been able to find an English translation. It’s a small novel about a bookseller who never leaves his shop, who treats his books like children and his interactions with the few customers who find their way to him.

A Suitable Boy (Vikram Seth)

The epic work of terrifying length, at least for me. Also, a sprawling family story set in post-partition India. I’m giving this a go because Jo made me, err…suggested it 😉 I think a readalong is the only thing that’ll make me stick with such a huge book.

Die blaue Stunde (Alonso Cueto)

La hora Azul, translated into English as The Blue Hour. After reading Stu’s review, I knew I had to read this one. It’s about the aftermath of the Peruvian civil war and a successful lawyer is confronted with his father’s sins.

Stille Wut (Sergio Bizzio)

Rabia, translated into English as Rage. The cover looked suitably creepy. A thriller about obsession, voyeurism, and class privilege.

What did you loot from the library this week?

Library Loot: September 21-27

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader. Marg has the Mr Linky this week.

Here’s my library loot (the fun one) for this week:

The City & The City (China Miéville)

This has never not been checked put from the library, I was beginning to think the library catalogue was lying to me. But lo and behold it looks like it’s finally my turn!

Lost (Gregory Maguire)

I loved Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister and Wicked, but was too devastated by the ending of the latter to read more of his works. I thought I might just be about ready to forgive Maguire (and Baum) and try Lost. Also, couldn’t resist the cover.

Little Hands Clapping (Dan Rhodes)

I simply can’t resist “morbidly funny” and “disturbing and delightful”, blurbs don’t you dare toy with me! But then I’m the idiot who falls for every supposed “black comedy”.

The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters (G. W. Dahlquist)

I’ve been eyeing this one for ages but never actually read it, I thought it couldn’t possibly be as great as it sounded. I hope you’ll all tell me whether it’s worth trying, I don’t want to torture myself with this chunkster hoping it’ll get better.

Skippy Dies (Paul Murray)

I’m always reading everything at least a year after everyone else. I remember seeing it in London but wasn’t convinced enough to actually buy the book, so thank you library for acquiring a copy.

The Case of the Man Who Died Laughing (Tarquin Hall)

I really enjoyed the first Vish Puri book and can always do with another mystery.

What did you loot from the library?

Library Loot: June 1-8

I might possibly gone a little mad and accumulated an insane number of library books in my place. But I love to have a lot of books to choose from and they make my room look much more cosy! And it’s not like the library has a limit, not that I’m aware of at least …

Here’s most of it:

Consuming Passion:Leisure and Pleasure in Victorian Britain (Judith Flanders)

Still unhealthily fascinated with the consumer revolution of the 19th century.

The Island of the Colorblind (Oliver Sacks)

Everything Sacks writes about is fascinating and my library had the English edition of this one so I thought I’d give it a go.

The 13th Element: The Sordid Tale of Murder, Fire and Phosphorus (John Emsley)

I’m reading this at them moment and it’s fantastic so far. How could I have survived without in-depth knowledge about phosphorus? 😉

Rape: A History from 1860 to the Present Day (Joanna Bourke)

I’m so not reading that one on my commute, I’ve learned from the whole American Psycho thing. Anyway, this looks like a great if disturbing look. It’s focused on the rapists not the victims, but as she says in her introduction, that title would have gone over even less well.

Citizen Vince (Jess Walter)

Less than Zero had a great first half and so much potential, so I thought I’d see what else Walter has written.

The Fahrenheit Twins (Michael Faber)

A short story collection and my first ever Faber read. I’ve read two stories so far and they are deliciously creepy and unsettling.

Borges and the Eternal Orangutans (Luis Fernando Verissimo)

A detective story, an anti-detective story, a parody of a detective story, Borges as a kind of armchair detective, academic feuds and a Poe conference. I loved it!

Meierhoffs Verschwörung / O Opositor (Luis Fernando Verissimo)

Loved the other book so much, I got another Verissimo. I couldn’t find the title of the English translation, if it exists. The German title roughly translates as Meierhoff’s conspiracy.

Nervous Conditions (Tsitsi Dangarembga)

The book on postcolonialism and black women.

Comedy in a Minor Key (Hans Keilson)

Re-loot, Iris motivated me to read more Dutch lit.

The Doubtful Guest (Edward Gorey)

I love Gorey’s stuff, whatever that says about my sense of humor.

Detection Unlimited (Georgette Heyer)

Obligatory cosy mysteries!

Messenger of Truth (Jaqueline Winspear)

Still wrestling with the Maisie Dobbs series.

Rattling the Bones (Ann Granger)

A Fran Varady book, a series I hadn’t tried before, but Fran is very likeable and the mystery quite cosy.

An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (P.D. James)

HAve to give James a chance at some point, hope this one is a good introduction to her works.

 The Pumpkin Eater (Penelope Mortimer)

Can’t remember where I read about it, but it was on my tbr list.

The Matchmaker (Stella Gibbons)

Curious about her other works.

Tea with Mr. Rochester (Frances Tower)

Cosy, without the crime (I think).

The Tortoise and the Hare (Elizabeth Jenkins)

Praised by everyone it seems, hope I’ll enjoy it as well. Love the cover art!

To the North (Elizabeth Bowen)

Have been wanting to read Bowen for a while.

Mariana (Monica Dickens)

Reading this one at the moment, it’s nice so far.

The Blessing (Nancy Mitford)

One should always have a Mitford around 😉

Love’s Shadow (Ada Leverson)

Finally I get to try one of those Bloomsbury books!

What have you recently looted from the library?

Library Loot: March 2- March 8

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Marg and Claire that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries!

 

Sorry for disappearing like that. Again! I’m starting to really dislike using the computer since I spend hours every day at it writing my paper. I might just go back to writing reviews on notepad and then quickly type them up. But I did check out a load of books. I know I’m very unlikely to read them all in the next 3 weeks, but I do love having plenty to choose from 🙂

The Ladies’ Paradise (Émile Zola)

This novel basically covers exactly what I’m writing my paper about, so I’m calling it research!

Women, Crime, and Custody in Victorian England (Lucia Zedner)

Same reason, and since this one’s not a novel, people actually believe me 😀

Victorian Heroines (Kimberley Reynoldts and Nicola Humble)

Couldn’t resist, tags in a library catalogue are dangerous!

Armadale (Wilkie Collins)

I’ve been wanting to read more Collis for ages and the library actually provided me with a copy with a normal print size!

The Odd Women (George Gissing)

I’ve been hearing great things about this one, and I haven’t read any Gissing yet.

The Children (Edith Wharton)

I didn’t even know Wharton had written a novel called The Children, apparently it’s a later one I’m intrigued.

Cakes and Ale (Somerset Maugham)

Wanted to have some cozies around, it’s carnival around here and that usually means horrible weather!

The Way Things Are (E. M. Delafield)

The only Delafield the library had, please someone tell me it’s cosy reading!

Travel with my Aunt (Graham Greene)

I read an excerpt of this somewhere and loved it so bonus points to the library for having this one.

The Jeeves Omnibus Vol. 1 (P.G. Wodehouse)

The cherry on top of a great loot 🙂 Have successfully infected my parents with the Jeeves and Wooster (the tv adaptation) mania, and that reminded me that I was due some Wodehouse (I’m trying to pace myself with his works).

The Making of a Muckraker (Jessica Mitford)

The uni library here isn’t too great, but there are some amazing surprises.

Body Parts: Essays on Life-writing (Hermione Lee)

I’ve been wanting to read more essays, and I’m pretty sure I’ll love Lee’s insights into life-writing.

 

I might need to get a cart like Mathilda to get this load back to the library. What did you loot from the library?

Library Loot: February 2-8

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries!

 

I’m an idiot, I looted a pile of books although I’m going home for the semester break on Sunday. But the weather has been grey and wet and stormy and I wanted a perfect cosy read for that but somehow my own books didn’t look as tempting last night. Also, my uni library has this system where you have to order books online and then they’ll unearth them for you from somewhere and you just have to pick them up. So yesterday I browsed the catalogue and hit order a bit too often, and when I picked up the books today I saw that I had also forgotten that I had ordered another book sometime this week, oops!

Howl’s Moving Castle (Diana Wynne Jones)

Seems like everyone’ read and loved this one, though I hadn’t ever heard of it before I started blogging. Cuppa tea and I’m curling up!

High Wages (Dorothy Whipple)

Persephone, though my edition is a Penguin, with the tiny print, some things never change 😉

Hand in Glove (Ngaio Marsh)

Obviously I had a craving for cosy books, and what could be more cosy than (golden age mystery) murder? ;P

Comedy in a Minor Key (Hans Keilson)

Saw this reviewed somewhere. A Dutch novella, I’m intrigued (also, I love that cover!).

Feminism: A Very Short Introduction (Margaret Walters)

Felt inspired by the Feminist Classics project, but haven’t had the time to read the books with anything like the concentration they deserve. So “very short” appealed to me.

The Theory of Absence: Subjectivity, Signification and Desire (Patrick Fuery)

I’m a nerd, or I would be if I hadn’t actually forgotten that I ordered this book.

About the voting (see previous post): I’m going to give you till Sunday, though the results look really interesting already! My tea’s ready and I’m going to curl up with the cosy books now.

What did you loot from the library this week?

Library Loot: January 19- 25

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Marg and Claire that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries! Claire has the Mr. Linky this week!

Another library loot, I just can’t resist the lure of the library!

 

The Herring-Seller’s Apprentice (J.C. Tyler)

First off, of course I got a mystery 😉 It sounded fun enough and I usually love Felony & Mayhem books. I started reading last night and couldn’t stop giggling!

In Search of Schrödinger’s Cat (John Gribbin)

The library has been renovating  and they moved some shelves around, which is how I stumbled over this work. The library catalogue told me it was missing, which has frustrated me because I’ve been wanting to read it for a while. Anyway, they let me check it out, though I didn’t get a finder’s fee 🙂


Migraine (Oliver Sacks)

This is one book I’ve been eyeing for some time. I love how exciting and informative Sacks’ writing is, and since I suffer from migraines this seemed like an obligatory read for me.

The Sex of Things: Gender and Consumption in Historical Perspective (ed. Victoria de Grazia with Ellen Furlough)

This one is research for a term paper, I wish I could keep it.

Crime, Gender and Consumer Culture: The History of Retailing and Consumption (Tammy C. Whitlock)

Also for my paper, can you guess the topic? 😉

 

Anyone read one of these? And what did you loot from the library this week?

Library Loot: January 12-18

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Marg and Claire that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries! Marg has the Mr Linky this week!

Here’s what I got from the library his week. Pretty sure I won’t get through it anytime soon, but I like having piles of books to choose from.

Mad, Bad and Sad: A History of Women and the Mind Doctors from 1880 to the Present (Lisa Appignanesi)

The treatment of women in psychiatry is such a fascinating topic. I loved Showalter’s The Female Malady and after reading The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox I put this one on my tbr list. Also, it’s published by Virago and I want to read it for Virago Reading Week.

The Penelopiad (Margaret Atwood)

I want to read this one for the Read A Myth challenge that I’m hosting with Jo from Bibliojunkie.

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Agatha Christie)

One can’t reread Christie mysteries too often, and this one is brilliant. I also get to write a short paper on it, so it’s all for research 😉


Ruth (Elizabeth Gaskell)

I’ve been wanting to try Gaskell for a while and my uni library has a great paperback copy with huge print (I’m sure my eyes will be pleased to get a break from squinting at tiny Penguin print).

The Spy (James Fenimore Cooper)

Not a huge Cooper fan, but I have to read this one for uni. Please someone tell me it’s a great read!

The Magic Toyshop (Angela Carter)

Can’t believe I still haven’t read anything by Angela Carter, but Virago Reading Week is a good reason to start.


One Good Turn (Kate Atkinson)

I was pretty impressed by Atkinson’s first Brodie book, Case Histories, so I was excited to see that my library had acquired the second one.

Adèle Blanc-Sec 4: Momies en Folie (Jaques Tardi)

Love the Adèle comics, and this one was fun as usual.

Skulduggery Pleasant (Derek Landy)

I’m currently reading this one, and it’s lots of fun in a super weird. Thought I’d try more YA and fantasy literature this year.

 

What did you loot from the library?

Library Loot: October 13 to 19

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries!

I’m back at my place and so it’s back to my library which is had a good selection of English titles but I tried to restrain myself because I still want to stop by the uni library 🙂

Here’s what I looted:

Flowers for Mrs Harris (Paul Gallico)

This is the first in series of four books around the adventures of Mrs Harris, a London charlady. I’ve read this one and second book and they are sweet and delightful.

Birds of a Feather (Jaqueline Winspear)

I tried the first Maisie Dobbs book recently but found it a bit too sad and Maisie’s style of solving mysteries more than strange, but I thought I’d give it another try (yes I couldn’t resist the cover 🙂 ).

Trent’s Last Case (E.C. Bentley)

This is a pre-Golden Age mystery and influenced the later queens of crime. I put this on the tbr after reading Ana’s review, so it’s all her fault 😉

Life in a Cold Climate: Nancy Mitford- The Biography (Laura Thompson)

I loved Love in a Cold Climate and am still working through the huge tome of Nancy and Evelyn Waugh’s letters so I thought I’d throw her biography into the mix.

 

Hotel Iris (Yoko Ogawa)

I haven’t read much Japanese literature except for Banana Yoshimoto’s works and one Murakami, so after reading Jo’s review of this one I decided to broaden my horizon.

The White Tiger (Aravind Adiga)

This one is for the South Asian challenge which I completely forgot about and I signed up for seven books!

Jasmine (Bharati Mukherjee)

Also for that challenge.

Oryx and Crake (Margaret Atwood)

Re-looted, and hopefully I’ll get around to it this time. I love the combination of Atwood and dystopian fiction and I’m also reading this for the Canadian challenge. Obviously I suck at challenges because I completely forget about them!

 

The Extraordinary Adventures of Adéle Blanc-Sec: Vol.5, 8 (Jaques Tardi)

Comics isn’t my favorite medium but maybe I need some time to get used to it. Have you seen the film of this series? It’s huge fun and so I decided to try the comics. They follow the adventures of Adéle and are mostly set in Paris, pre-WWI.

Fun Home (Alison Bechdel)

I’ve heard so many people praise this one graphic lit class last semester that I want to know what it’s all about.

Forever Summer (Nigella Lawson)

I’m back at my place and this means back to cooking instead of enjoying my mom’s food (sigh!).

 

What did you loot from the library this week?

Library Loot: September 15-21

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Marg and Claire that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries!

I did consider not going to the library yesterday, but I really wanted to get some travel guides and now I’m glad that I did because Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand was finally not checked out! And because I have the house to myself this afternoon, I’m going try to make symmetrical petit fours (though I guess I should make that a lifelong challenge) and read Major Pettigrew. I might also start purring with delight! 🙂


Here’s this week’s loot:


Die Mittagsfrau/ The Blind Side of the Heart (Julia Franck)

You might wonder from reading German literature whether time stopped after the fall of the Berlin wall because German writers seem to write about only two topics, WWII and the fall of the wall. This one spans the time from WWI to WWII, but is mostly about one woman’s life and psyche. I hope it’s as good as it’s made out to be, you never know with hype.

Als der Zirkus kam (Wlodzimierz Odojewski)

I have no idea whether this has been translated into English, it certainly should be as Odojewski is one of the most important modern Polish writers. In this novel, he tells the story of adolescent Marek against the backdrop of the war.

Major Pettigrew’ s Last Stand (Helen Simonson)

I think everyone but me has read this one, I can’t wait to curl up with this one.


Kopenhagen/ Copenhagen

And finally two travel guides, the reason why I went to the library in the first place. I’m going to spend a weekend there next month and have never been to Denmark before, so I want to be prepared. Any suggestions what I have to see?

What did you loot from the library this week?

Library Loot: September 8-14

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries!

Marg has the Mr. Linky this week!


Since I’m home at my parents this month, I have to make do with the small-town library. But I did manage to find some great books, even if many of them are in German (which I realize is something I shouldn’t hold against a German library 😀 ). And no, I will definitely not be able to read all of those this month, but I like the pile next to my bed.

The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox (Maggie O’Farrell)

I’ve heard only great things about this book so of course I couldn’t resist when I saw it at the library.

A Life Like Other People’s (Alan Bennett)

Like most people I loved The Uncommon Reader, and then I read Bennet’s The Clothes they Stood up in & The Lady in the Van and knew I wanted to read everything else he had written, too. This book then is Bennett’s memoir.

Generation X (Donald Coupland)

I’m probably the only one who hasn’t read this yet.

The Easter Parade (Richard Yates)

I’m reading this one at the moment, and it’s fantastic. Yates can do no wrong.

Little Face (Sophie Hannah)

Literary crime, literary thriller, I like it! This is the first book in Hannah’s series around the police officers Charlie and Simon. I read a later book in the series first, and now think that if you enjoy one, you’ll like the others. They seem to be pretty similar.

The Raw Shark Texts (Steven Hall)

This is the third time I’ve checked this out, hopefully no one will request it before I’m through with it, argh!

Mao II (Don DeLillo)

DeLillo’s written so many books, I’m determined to like one of them!

Musicophilia (Oliver Sacks)

Can’t wait to find out what Sacks makes of music and the brain, it’s probably going to be awesome. Though I’d love to get hold of his work on migraine.

This is Your Brain on Music (Daniel Levitin)

More on music, I adore the title! And there is a quote by Sacks on the cover 🙂

The Perfect Crime (Jean Baudrillard)

Yup, this is the nerdy loot. It’ll probably take me 30 minutes to read the first page, and then some research to find out what it means 😉

Symbolic Exchange and Death (Jean Baudrillard)

I thought with two of Baudrillard’s work, I am bound to find one more accessible.

Culture and Imperialism (Edward W. Said)

I’ve only reads some excerpts here and there by Said, I want to step it up to some chapters. I wish Orientalism hadn’t been checked out though.

What did you recently loot from the library?